Starting a Civil Forensic Practice: Practical Guidelines and Ethical Considerations

Thursday, July 19, 2018
12:00pm - 2:00pm Eastern time
2 CE Credits

Presented by:
Michael R. Villanueva, Psy.D.
Southern Oregon Neuropsychological Clinic, LLC

This webinar will address starting forensic work within the context of an already established clinical practice. We will discuss the importance of maintaining a clear separation between forensic and clinical evaluations.  Though forensic and clinical evaluations have much in common, there are a few areas of distinction that are critical for the clinician to consider. The language of a forensic report may be unfamiliar to many clinicians, and we will discuss such terms as “limitations” and “restrictions.”  In addition, we will define levels of certainty, such as "more likely than not," that are often required of the forensic examiner. The webinar focuses on independent medical examinations (IME) and file reviews.  In addition, the presentation will cover ethical considerations such as "dual roles" that are important for the clinician to consider when maintaining both a clinical and forensic practice. We will also discuss the importance of making statements that are objective, verifiable, and remain within the limitations of the information available.  This webinar does not offer marketing advice, but rather provides the clinician thinking of entering the forensic realm with tools to navigate new territory and successfully meet exciting challenges.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between a clinical and a forensic referral.
  2. List key points to discuss with the claimant prior to an IME.
  3. List and discuss primary ethical considerations when conducting IME’s and file reviews.
  4. Outline ways of approaching typical challenges such as third-party observers, release of raw data, prospective test selection by a third-party, and demands to reveal test lists in advance.
  5. List and describe examples of effective forensic report-writing.

Target Audience: Licensed neuropsychologists presently engaged in clinical practice who desire to make civil forensic referrals a part of their professional work.

Instructional Level: Introductory

NAN members login and non-members create an account to:


Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Michael R. Villanueva, Psy.D. is board-certified in clinical neuropsychology (ABPP-CN).  He has his clinical practice in southern Oregon where he evaluates patients by physician referral for condition such as dementia, traumatic brain injury, stroke, and MS. In addition to clinical work, Dr. Villanueva also accepts forensic referrals, primarily independent medical examinations and file reviews. Dr. Villanueva brings a unique perspective to the issue of clinical and forensic work, being a clinician in a small community which brings about challenges pertinent to dual role, and challenges in building a forensic practice from a small potential pool of referrals.

Short- and Long-Term Outcomes After Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

Wednesday, August 15, 2018
12:30pm - 2:00pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits


Presented by:

Jacobus Donders, Ph.D.
Chief Psychologist
Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital

This webinar will review the behavioral, cognitive and psychosocial outcomes of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) at various intervals.  The emphasis will be on empirical research within the last dozen years.  Key concepts pertaining to injury variables will be illustrated with reviews of various neuroimaging findings.  Moderators and mediators of various outcomes after pediatric TBI will also be addressed.  The presentation will end with a review of variables to consider in transition to adulthood, including assessment of civil capacity, illustrated with a case study.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe predictors of recovery from pediatric TBI of various severities and at various intervals.
  2. Discuss the differences in predictors of outcomes in various domains.
  3. Explain the empirical base for assessment and intervention after pediatric TBI.
  4. List important factors to consider in transition to adulthood.

Target Audience: Graduate students, interns, postdoctoral residents and early career professionals

Instructional Level: Intermediate

NAN members login and non-members create an account to:


Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Jacobus Donders, Ph.D. is the Chief Psychologist at Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI.  He is board-certified in Clinical Neuropsychology as well as Rehabilitation Psychology through the American Board of Professional Neuropsychology.  In addition to being an active clinical practitioner, he has served on multiple editorial and executive boards, has authored or co-authored more than 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals, and has edited or co-edited five textbooks.  Dr. Donders is a current associate editor of the journals Child Neuropsychology and Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology.  He is also a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and of the National Academy of Neuropsychology.

Clinical Neuropsychology and Technology: What's New and How We Can Use It

Wednesday, August 29, 2018
2:00pm - 3:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:
Thomas D. Parsons, Ph.D.
Director, Computational Neuropsychology and Simulation (CNS) Laboratory
Professor of Psychology
University of North Texas

Although today’s neuropsychological assessment procedures are widely used, neuropsychologists have been slow to embrace technological advancements. The neuropsychological assessment procedures most commonly in use represent a technology that has barely changed since the first scales were developed in the early 1900s. Furthermore, clinical neuropsychologists are increasingly asked to make predictions about the impact of a given patient’s neurocognitive abilities and disabilities on everyday functioning. After a brief review of current neuropsychological assessments, there is an exploration of novel technologies (e.g., virtual reality environments) for enhanced neuropsychological assessments.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the history of computerized testing and how these developments shaped the present status of automated assessment. 
  2. Describe the ways that current and developing technologies can enhance traditional methods of neurocognitive assessment going forward.
  3. Explain how virtual environments and scenario-based assessment can enhance the evaluation of patient capabilities and provide data with increased ecological relevance. 
  4. Discuss the benefits of incorporating computational neuropsychology and data analytics to address diagnostic and assessment issues.

Target Audience: Clinical Neuropsychologists and clinical psychology students

Instructional Level: Intermediate

NAN members login and non-members create an account to:


Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Thomas D. Parsons, Ph.D. is a Clinical Neuropsychologist, Professor of Psychology, and Director of the Computational Neuropsychology and Simulation (CNS) Laboratory at the University of North Texas (UNT). Prior to joining the faculty at UNT, Dr. Parsons was an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California's Institute for Creative Technologies. Much of Dr. Parsons's research integrates neuropsychology, psychophysiology, and simulation technologies for novel assessment, modeling, and training of neurocognitive and affective processes. He is a leading scientist in this area and he has been PI of 17 funded projects during his career and an investigator on an additional 13 funded projects. In addition to his patents for eHarmony.com's Matching System (U.S. Patent Nos. 2004/6735568; 2014/0180942 A1), he has invented and validated virtual reality-based assessments of attention, spatial abilities, memory, and executive functions. In addition to his five books, he has over 200 publications in peer reviewed journals and book chapters. He has served as Associate Editor for Frontiers in Psychiatry, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, and the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. His contributions to neuropsychology were recognized when he received the 2013 National Academy of Neuropsychology Early Career Achievement award. In 2014, he was awarded Fellow status in the National Academy of Neuropsychology.

Review and Update on Adult Performance Validity Testing

Thursday, September 13, 2018
12:00pm - 1:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits


Presented by:

Patrick Armistead-Jehle, Ph.D.
Chief, Concussion Clinic
Munson Army Health Center

This course will provide a review and update on performance validity testing (PVT) in adult neuropsychological evaluations.  Recent literature discussing the utility of validity testing in neuropsychological assessment, as well as reviews of stand-alone and embedded measures, will be discussed.  Special topics to be covered will include:  (1) feedback to patients and referring providers; and (2) use of PVTs in special populations. Emphasis will also be given to future directions in PVT research.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the influence of performance validity testing on interpretation of cognitive test results.
  2. Explain and utilize feedback strategies with patients and referring providers. 
  3. Discuss application of PVTs in patients with low IQ, dementia, and English as a second language.

Target Audience: Neuropsychologists, as well as psychologists involved in cognitive assessments.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

NAN members login and non-members create an account to:


Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Patrick Armistead-Jehle, Ph.D. ABPP-CN is the chief of the concussion clinic at Munson Army Health Center at Fort Leavenworth, KS.  He completed undergraduate training at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and subsequently obtained a PhD in clinical psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University.  He is board certified by the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology.  Dr. Armistead-Jehle has published several dozen articles in peer reviewed psychological and neuropsychological journals, with the majority if these publications addressing the topics of validity testing and traumatic brain injury.  In addition to part time research and administrative duties, he maintains day to day patient care responsibilities.