An Update on the Neuropsychology of HIV and Other Infectious Diseases

Wednesday, January 24, 2018
3:00pm - 4:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:
Steven Paul Woods, Psy.D.
Professor of Psychology
University of Houston

Clinical neuropsychologists are likely to encounter persons infected with HIV and other neurotropic viruses (e.g., hepatitis C), which may be the primary condition for a referral or an incidental risk factor for neurocognitive impairment. In this 90-minute webinar, we will provide an update on the neuropsychological aspects of infectious disease, focusing primarily on HIV. Specifically, we will critically review and discuss recent literature on: 1) changes in the epidemiology of HIV disease, which is increasingly affecting older adults; 2) brain systems involved in HIV infection; 3) the neuropsychological profile of HIV disease and the diagnosis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders; 4) the influence of common moderating factors, such as premorbid variables, psychiatric comorbidity, and co-infection with HCV on the expression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders; 5) HIV’s impact on health behaviors (e.g., medication adherence) and everyday functioning (e.g., household management); and 6) emergent pharmacological and rehabilitation efforts to manage HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the recent changes in the epidemiology of HIV disease and the influence of infection and its comorbidities on brain structure and function.
  2. Explain the practical advantages and limitations of current approaches to diagnosing HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.
  3. Discuss the effects of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders on health behaviors (e.g., medication adherence) and everyday functioning (e.g., household management).

Target Audience: Clinical neuropsychologists

Instructional Level: Intermediate

NAN members login and non-members create an account to:



Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Steven Paul Woods, Psy.D.
is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Houston, where he is the Director of the Cognitive Neuropsychology of Daily Life (CNDL) Laboratory. Dr. Woods also holds appointments as an Adjunct Professor at UC San Diego (Psychiatry) and the University of Western Australia (School of Psychological Science). His program of research uses cognitive theory to enhance the clinical detection, prediction, and remediation of real-world health outcomes in various neuropsychological populations, including HIV disease and aging. In particular, he is interested in how people’s ability to “remember to remember” (i.e., prospective memory) affects health-related behaviors such as adhering to medications. Dr. Woods is the Director of Clinical Neuropsychology Training at the University of Houston and is an active teacher, both in the classroom and in the laboratory. He is a licensed psychologist and operates an evidence-based neuropsychology clinic that serves HIV+ persons at the Thomas Street Health Center in Houston. Dr. Woods is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 40, Society for Clinical Neuropsychology) and the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN).
 

The Neuropsychology (Broadly Conceived) of MSA, PSP, and CBD

Wednesday, February 21, 2018
12:00pm - 1:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:
Adam Gerstenecker, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Neurology
Division of Neuropsychology
The University of Alabama at Birmingham

The primary objective of this presentation will be to review the cognitive and behavioral features of the different atypical parkinsonian syndromes in which motor symptoms dominate early clinical symptomatology: multiple systems atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). The impact of cognitive and behavioral deficits on quality of life, associations between neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric findings and brain imaging, and cognitive and behavioral symptom management are also discussed. Information included in this presentation was acquired through review of the available MSA, PSP, and CBD literature, with emphasis given to studies investigating the cognitive and behavioral features of the syndromes.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the neuropsychological features of MSA, PSP, and CBD.
  2. Explain the impact of neuropsychological features on quality of life in MSA, PSP, and CBD.
  3. Describe the current strategies for symptom management in MSA, PSP, and CBD.

Target Audience: Clinicians and researchers interested in the cognitive, behavioral, and functional aspects of MSA, PSP, and CBD

Instructional Level: Intermediate

NAN members login and non-members create an account to:



Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Adam Gerstenecker, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). Dr. Gerstenecker has expertise in atypical parkinsonisms in both clinical and research settings. His research in PSP has been funded by NIH/NIA and CurePSP. He has published a number of peer-reviewed papers on the cognitive, behavioral, and functional features of PSP and authored review papers and book chapters on the neuropsychological aspects of atypical parkinsonian disorders.