Review and Update on Adult Performance Validity Testing

Thursday, September 13, 2018
12:00pm - 1:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits


Presented by:

Patrick Armistead-Jehle, Ph.D.
Chief, Concussion Clinic
Munson Army Health Center

This course will provide a review and update on performance validity testing (PVT) in adult neuropsychological evaluations.  Recent literature discussing the utility of validity testing in neuropsychological assessment, as well as reviews of stand-alone and embedded measures, will be discussed.  Special topics to be covered will include:  (1) feedback to patients and referring providers; and (2) use of PVTs in special populations. Emphasis will also be given to future directions in PVT research.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the influence of performance validity testing on interpretation of cognitive test results.
  2. Explain and utilize feedback strategies with patients and referring providers. 
  3. Discuss application of PVTs in patients with low IQ, dementia, and English as a second language.

Target Audience: Neuropsychologists, as well as psychologists involved in cognitive assessments.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.

Patrick Armistead-Jehle, Ph.D. ABPP-CN is the chief of the concussion clinic at Munson Army Health Center at Fort Leavenworth, KS.  He completed undergraduate training at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and subsequently obtained a PhD in clinical psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University.  He is board certified by the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology.  Dr. Armistead-Jehle has published several dozen articles in peer reviewed psychological and neuropsychological journals, with the majority if these publications addressing the topics of validity testing and traumatic brain injury.  In addition to part time research and administrative duties, he maintains day to day patient care responsibilities.

Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Improving Accuracy of Test Interpretation for Clinicians and Researchers

Wednesday, November 14, 2018
12:00pm - 1:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits


Presented by:

Brian L. Brooks, Ph.D.
Director of Neuropsychology
Alberta Children's Hospital

Neuropsychologists administer and interpret a large number of tests during an assessment. It can be under-appreciated, however, that interpreting multiple test scores is different than interpreting a single test score. Multiple scores have scatter, intra-individual variability, and higher prevalence rates of ‘abnormal’ findings than a single score, so they must be interpreted simultaneously (i.e., multivariate base rates; MVBRs). This webinar will review the psychometric principles associated with MVBRs of low scores: (1) low scores are common across all test batteries; (2) the number of low scores depends on the cutscore used; (3) the number of low scores depends on the number of tests administered; (4) the number of low scores varies by examinees’ demographics; and (5) the number of low scores varies by examinees’ intelligence. Examples using pediatric, adult, and older adult data will demonstrate these principles. Newer studies considering the MVBRs of reliable change scores will also be introduced.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the psychometric principles for interpreting multiple test scores.
  2. Explain that there is variability in test scores and that low scores are common in healthy people.
  3. Apply multivariate base rates in everyday clinical practice as an interpretive technique to reduce misdiagnoses of cognitive impairment.
  4. Critique the practice of over-interpreting an isolated low score.

Target Audience: Neuropsychologists and psychologists at all career levels who assess children, young adults, and older adults

Instructional Level: Intermediate

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Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Brian L. Brooks, Ph.D. is a pediatric neuropsychologist and director of neuropsychology services at the Alberta Children’s Hospital in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He is also an adjunct faculty member with the Departments of Pediatrics, Clinical Neurosciences, and Psychology at the University of Calgary, a full member with the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, an associate member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, and the research lead for the Alberta Children’s Hospital Complex Concussion Clinic. His primary research focus is on neuropsychological outcomes from concussion, including early diagnosis, prognostication of outcome, potential treatment options, and long-term effects. He has over 100 peer-reviewed journal publications in the field of neuropsychology, including papers on psychometrics, test interpretation, performance validity testing, and outcomes from various medical, neurological, and psychiatric diseases. He is the co-author of three neuropsychological measures (ChAMP, MVP, and MEMRY) and is the co-editor of the first pediatric-focused forensic textbook, Pediatric Forensic Neuropsychology. He has been recognized with several distinctions from the National Academy of Neuropsychology, including twice receiving the Nelson Butters award 2010 and 2014, receiving the early career award in 2014, and being elected as a fellow in 2015. He is currently supported by an Embedded Clinician Researcher award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).