Part 1: Understanding the Latest in Dementia and the Science of Successful Brain Aging 

June 7, 2022
12:00-1:30 PM ET
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by: 
Maureen K. O'Connor, Psy.D., ABPP-CN

Director of Neuropsychology, Bedford Veterans Hospital
Assistant Professor of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine
Director, Research Education Component, Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center





Andrew E. Budson, M.D.

Chief, Cognitive & Behavioral Neurology and
Associate Chief of Staff for Education, VA Boston Healthcare System







In this webinar we will begin by reviewing the differences between normal brain aging and dementia. We will present the latest updates on several common neurodegenerative diseases you may encounter in clinical practice, including advances in the clinical use of biomarkers and treatment considerations. We will offer the latest scientific evidence on lifestyle factors that are important to promoting successful brain aging so that you are able to provide practical advice and recommendations to your patients and their families.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:
1. Explain how the brain changes in normal aging
2. Discuss the presentation of several common neurodegenerative diseases
3. Identify the role of biomarkers in clinical use 
4. Assess various treatment considerations in Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias

Target Audience:  Psychologists
Instructional Level:  Intermediate

Part 2: Caring for the Dementia Caregiver

June 21, 2022
12:00-1:30 PM ET
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by: 
Maureen K. O'Connor, Psy.D., ABPP-CN

Director of Neuropsychology, Bedford Veterans Hospital
Assistant Professor of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine
Director, Research Education Component, Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center





Andrew E. Budson, M.D.

Chief, Cognitive & Behavioral Neurology and
Associate Chief of Staff for Education, VA Boston Healthcare System







This webinar will focus on describing the experience of caregivers for individuals with dementia. We will present information that will help you understand the ways in which we can help caregivers be better prepared for their journey. You will learn how to help families build a care team and we will explain approaches to managing common problems in dementia that can be shared with patients’ families. Additionally, given that individuals with dementia and their caregivers benefit from the relationships they have with one another, we will present ways to help caregivers sustain their relationships with their loved one with dementia. Lastly, we will discuss how to help caregivers prepare for the future.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the elements of a care team for dementia caregivers
2. List approaches to managing common behavioral problems in dementia
3. Discuss ways to help individuals with dementia and their caregivers sustain their relationship
4. Identify strategies to help caregivers prepare for the future

Target Audience:  Psychologists
Instructional Level:  Intermediate



Dr. Maureen O'Connor is a board-certified neuropsychologist engaged in clinical work, research, and teaching. She received her doctorate in psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, focusing her dissertation on the differentiation of depression versus Alzheimer's disease. She attended Yale University School of Medicine for her predoctoral internship, where she conducted outpatient and inpatient memory evaluations for adults with a broad range of diagnostic presentations. She went on to complete one year of postdoctoral residency at Cornell Weil Medical Center/Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and two additional years of residency at the Bedford VA Hospital/Boston University School of Medicine. In 2005 she accepted an appointment at the Bedford VA Hospital as the Director of Neuropsychology. In that role she established the Bedford Memory Diagnostic Clinic, specifically designed to evaluate and treat older Veterans with memory loss. In 2009 she accepted the Young Alumni Achievement Award from the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She has served on the boards of the Massachusetts Neuropsychological Society and the National Academy of Neuropsychology. Dr. O’Connor is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology at Boston University (BU) School of Medicine. In 2019 she was appointed the Director of the Research Education Training Component at BU in the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Dr. O'Connor's research interests include understanding and developing interventions to improve the lives of adults with memory loss and the lives of the family members that help provide care. She has been the recipient of foundation, philanthropic, and federal funding. Most recently the National Institute of Health and National Institute of Aging provided Dr. O’Connor and colleagues with $3.2 million of funding to support a 5-year research project examining how relationship factors impact couples navigating a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to her ongoing research activities, Dr. O'Connor continues to evaluate and treat individuals with memory loss while teaching doctoral students, interns, and residents in neuropsychology.

Dr. Andrew E. Budson, a board-certified cognitive behavioral neurologist, is on a crusade to empower individuals, families, and doctors with the knowledge they need surrounding memory loss and dementia. His co-authored textbook, Memory Loss, Alzheimer's Disease, and Dementia: A Practical Guide for Clinicians, now in its 3rd edition, has been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, and Japanese. His award-winning, co-authored book, Seven Steps to Managing Your Memory: What’s Normal, What’s Not, and What to Do About It, explains how individuals can distinguish changes in memory due to Alzheimer's versus normal aging; what medications, diets, and exercise regimes can help; and the best habits, strategies, and memory aids to use. It is being translated into Chinese and Korean. His latest co-authored book, Six Steps to Managing Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: A Guide for Families, helps families manage issues with memory, language, vision, behavior, driving, incontinence, sleep, and more. Educated at Haverford College and Harvard Medical School, he is Chief of Cognitive & Behavioral Neurology at the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Associate Director of the Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Professor of Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine, and Lecturer in Neurology at Harvard Medical School.